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Photos from TwinLakesRd on 2004-Jul16:
Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: in flight Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: Bonapartes gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia): in flight Bonapartes gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia): in flight Bonapartes gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia): Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes)?: in flight Golden plover (Pluvialis dominica): Early coralroot (Corallorhiza trifida): pale form Early coralroot (Corallorhiza trifida): dark form clump Early coralroot (Corallorhiza trifida): dark form Early coralroot (Corallorhiza trifida): dark form closeup Golden plover (Pluvialis dominica): Golden plover (Pluvialis dominica): Golden plover (Pluvialis dominica): Bonapartes gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia): Willow-ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus): Willow-ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus): Willow-ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus): Alpine azalea (Loiseleuria procumbens): Alpine azalea (Loiseleuria procumbens): Alpine bilberry=Arctic blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum): Alpine bilberry=Arctic blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum): Trailing willow (Salix arctophila): Trailing willow (Salix arctophila): Trailing willow (Salix arctophila): Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa):

Photos from hike near EastTwinLake on 2004-Jul16:
Purple paintbrush (Castilleja sp): Purple paintbrush (Castilleja sp): Purple paintbrush (Castilleja sp): clump Purple paintbrush (Castilleja sp): pale form Purple paintbrush (Castilleja sp): pale form tundra: from overlook Mountain cranberry=Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea): Syrphid-fly (Syrphidae sp): on Mountain cranberry=Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) Syrphid-fly (Syrphidae sp): on Mountain cranberry=Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): the first photographed in Churchill? Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): the first photographed in Churchill? brighter Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): pair in sunlight Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): pair in shade Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): pair in shade Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): in shade Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): in shade closeup Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): many in shade photographers: Rich+John photographers: Rich+John+Huguette photographers: Lorne ignoring mosquitoes photographers: Lorne with mosquitoes photographers: Lorne+Rich photographers: John+Lorne+Rich photographers: John+Lorne+Rich Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): clump in shade Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): clump in sunlight Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): in sunlight Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): in sunlight closeup Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): pair in sunlight Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): in sunlight closeup Fairy-slipper (Calypso bulbosa var americana): pair in sunlight Lapland lousewort (Pedicularis lapponica): snow-in-July: Huguette+Doris play in snowbank overexposed snow-in-July: Huguette+Doris play in snowbank snow-in-July: Doris at snowbank underexposed snow-in-July: John+Chris in snowbank underexposed

Photos from TwinLakesRd on 2004-Jul16:
Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): or Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica)? Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): or Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica)? Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): or Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica)? Marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa): or Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica)?

Photos from TwinLakesRd (afternoon) on 2004-Jul16:
Buck-bean (Menyanthes trifoliata): flowers Willet (Tringa semipalmata): Willet (Tringa semipalmata): Willet (Tringa semipalmata): Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica): in flight Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica): pair Hudsonian godwit (Limosa haemastica): pair Dwarf labrador-tea (Ledum palustre): Cloudberry=Baked-apple raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus): Cloudberry=Baked-apple raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus): flower Cloudberry=Baked-apple raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus): Cloudberry=Baked-apple raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus): plant Cloudberry=Baked-apple raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus): plant Velvet bells (Alpine bartsia): Velvet bells (Alpine bartsia): Velvet bells (Alpine bartsia): Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes): Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes): Lesser yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes):

Photos from WestTwinLake on 2004-Jul16:
Northern green bog-orchid (Platanthera aquilonis): closeup Bonapartes gull (Chroicocephalus philadelphia): Heart-leaved twayblade (Listera cordata var cordata): plant Heart-leaved twayblade (Listera cordata var cordata): flowers Grey jay=Whiskeyjack (Perisoreus canadensis): Three-leaved solomons-seal (Maianthemum trifolium): plant Three-leaved solomons-seal (Maianthemum trifolium): flower Bog laurel (Kalmia polifolia):

Photos from CNSC on 2004-Jul16:
Doris: models a hat with veil

Photos from the Wales & Whales Tour (FortPrinceOfWales+Beluga whaleWhales) on 2004-Jul16:
group-2004: on boat Fort P-O-W: front door Fort P-O-W: inscription above door Fort P-O-W: plaque Fort P-O-W: inside Fort P-O-W: cannoneers view of a ship Fort P-O-W: cannon rear Fort P-O-W: cannon muzzle Fort P-O-W: cannon inscription Large-flowered pyrola (Pyrola grandiflora): Large-flowered pyrola (Pyrola grandiflora): clump Churchill grain terminal: from across the river Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): grey+white Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Churchill grain terminal: from the bay Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): and Churchill Grain Terminal from the bay Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): several underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): underwater Churchill-skyline: from the bay ship: in Churchill Captain Neufeld: at the helm Parasitic jaeger (Stercorarius parasiticus): harrasses Tern (Sternidae sp) Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): under setting sun Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): under setting sun Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): under setting sun
Note: The inscriptions seen on cannons (not Rich's camera) represent: (1) Queen Anne (1665-1714) the last of the Stuart monarchy; (2) other cannons were for George I, her successor. [Research by Doris]


Photos from BirdCove? on 2004-Jul16:
me: and krummholz krummholz: at sunset krummholz: at sunset by Doris with film rocks: after sunset water: after sunset

Note to myself: at the beginning of this Churchill trip, I switched my camera's exposure-metering mode to "spot-AF-area" - hoping to get better results in unusual lighting situations such as a bird with a bright sky background. Previously I have used "overall average or matrix" (briefly), and "centre-weighted average" (mostly); both of which needed much fiddling with exposure-compensation for situations like bright-sky as background. This new mode worked well on some shots - but produced surprising (and bad) results on most of those "snowbank" background pictures. (Hopefully i will remember more about what i focus-locked on, the next time this happens; a 10-day trip is the wrong time to experiment, since too much time passes before one gets a good look at the results.) I am puzzled by what sort of metering results when also picking "focus far" mode - since then one sees nothing about the selected region.

I have also recently begun using "-0.3" as my standard setting, since by default the camera lives too dangerously with respect to overexposing. (Moderate brightening can be done later on the computer; whereas any overexposed regions have lost all detail forever.) Using "-0.7" might be even better, but would mean more time spent "gimping", since then almost all photos would need brightening.

I continue to encounter situations where the auto-focus decides to focus on the background, rather than on the subject - mostly for a tall skinny plant as subject. On several occasions today, I resorted to Manual-focus in such cases, and with much more success than the first time i tried it. For example, the dark-EarlyCoralroot and HeartLeavedTwayblade photos were done with manual-focus. Have since read in the manual, that manual-focus works in user-set-1/2/3 but not A; and since the camera comes set for user-set-A, that explains why manual-focus was completely unusable the first time i tried it. Apparently Nikon was trying to make a camera for 2 kinds of users: those who want a simple point-and-shoot, which is what user-set-A is for; and those who want more control, and must avoid user-set-A. Someone who really wants a simple idiot-proof point-and-shoot, is bound to come to grief at some point, by the accidental touching of buttons - unless of course that user began by epoxying all those buttons. Speaking of which, my Delete button has mysteriously stopped functioning. (Could this be due to Deet on my fingers?)

After a year and a half with this camera, I feel that I should have learned how to cope with its auto-focus quirks, but have not. The camera actually has 2 different auto-focus quirks: (1) as a power-saving or perhaps time-saving feature, it will sometimes avoid going through the entire range of focusing distances, instead retrying that which the previous auto-focus attempt picked - this is especially annoying when one is retrying simply because the previous attempt got it wrong; and (2) going through the entire range, but picking other than the nearest object - this happens more often with a skinny subject; and it happens more often in low-light situations. Other users of the 5700 have reported that turning the camera off then back on will fix the focus quirks - I believe that such a reboot only gets one out of the quirk-1 situation - as does simply focusing on something else between attempts. Others have also suggested that a somewhat low battery makes the focus quirks worse - I am skeptical - the camera may do more of that quirk-1 "retrying" when the battery is low, but it is quirk-2 that I find hard to live with. I've noticed that Nikon has a "firmware upgrade" for the 5700 - but have ignored it since the problems addressed do not affect me - whereas I would be keenly interested if they made improvements to the auto-focus algorithm!

Sometimes I ask myself why not use manual-focus all the time - the answer: when the auto-focus works, it generally does better than a skilled human with exellent vision, since when focusing manually, one must judge the sharpness of a 5000 kilopixel image, by looking at a 180 kilopixel rendition thereof, which simply cannot be done, except by guesswork! (I recall that a similar model from Fuji will display a blown-up central-portion during manual-focusing, which could well make manual-focus usable even with a CCD-driven viewfinder; however Nikon seems under the illusion that their auto-focus works so perfectly that there's no need to provide a usable manual-focus.) How to approach manual-focusing: first determine that range of distances at which the subject looks equally sharp, then pick the middle thereof. (One uses the geometric mean rather than the arithmetic, although such a fine distinction may well seem absurd, given that Nikon provides no numeric distance, just a sliding bar.)

I've just noticed another kind of "manual focus mode" (pg112), where one gets to select one of the 5 focus areas... Hmm, this doesn't sound promising, since the focus-confirmation usually highlights the correct subject, even when the focus is really on the more distant background.